Posts Tagged ‘unemployment’

Why Your Life Sucks – The Rise of the Permanent Temp Economy (via NYT)

February 6, 2013

This was a great article, well worth the read, that explains one of the many facets of how the threats to your personal economic security have arisen from past practices. Here is one part of how job insecurity has been creeping up on us since 1947:

The Rise of the Permanent Temp Economy

Politicians across the political spectrum herald “job creation,” but frightfully few of them talk about what kinds of jobs are being created. Yet this clearly matters: According to the Census Bureau, one-third of adults who live in poverty are working but do not earn enough to support themselves and their families.

A quarter of jobs in America pay below the federal poverty line for a family of four ($23,050). Not only are many jobs low-wage, they are also temporary and insecure. Over the last three years, the temp industry added more jobs in the United States than any other… Read More

via New York Times: The Rise of the Permanent Temp Economy.

I know that, in my career field, there is a lot of “contracting” – employment where the “employers” are just middle men, pimps who sell the labor of others to their clients (the companies that used to employ people) and reap tremendous profits for doing, well, nothing really, beyond payroll (which they farm out to ADP anyway), and the actual “we’re sorry, but you are no longer employed” conversation.

You are just a commodity.

(Ironically, when I spell checked this post prior to publishing it, the proofreading suggested I use the word “use” in place of “employ”. Ya think?)

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According To The 1%, The 1% Are NOT The Job Creators

May 20, 2012

The best, most well explained, explicit demolition of the Job Creator myth that I have ever read.

From the National Journal:

As Hanauer puts it, he and his rich friends, for all their lavish parties and jet-away vacations, don’t buy enough shirts, cars, and restaurant meals to match the spending that would occur if, say, their wealth was divided up among thousands of poor families. Studies on what economists call “marginal propensity to consume” bear out this idea.

Hence Hanauer’s claim that middle-class consumers, not innovators, create jobs. Amazon didn’t create a new group of book buyers; it just peddled a more convenient way to buy books. Its success created lots of jobs in Seattle, Amazon’s hometown, but it also killed lots of jobs in strip malls across the country. Increasing the number of book buyers would boost sales and jobs in the industry, with no downside.

And…

The middle class incubates entrepreneurs because it offers a good combination of time, resources, and motivation to invest in skills and climb the innovation ladder. Put it this way: The comforts that flowed from the Pacific Coast Feather Co., his then-modest family business, provided Nick Hanauer with a house full of books and days full of time to explore big ideas. Think of those comforts as an investment. The eventual return was Hanauer’s venture-capital portfolio. Poor families just scraping by at the margins can’t make those investments, so their children struggle to achieve in school and pursue higher education. Children from rich families may, thanks to their extreme childhood comforts, lack the desire to build wealth and climb the economic ladder, which the Kauffman study found to be a key motivation for would-be entrepreneurs.

The economy sags when kids who could have grown up to be physicists end up spending their lives brewing lattes at Starbucks. Or when a young woman born to be a teacher finds herself babysitting, for peanuts, while she waits for a classroom to open up.

Read the whole article here.

12 Days of Funny – Day Ten

December 25, 2011

What a bargain…

No complaints!

For the next 2 days I’ll be continuing to present some of the best political cartoons I have seen recently.

(Thanks again to American Progress for the funny daily cartoons, like this one! You can see their archive and sign up for the daily funny in your inbox here.)


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